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RPF Surrenders War against AR: Full Recap

TOBOGGAN, Army Republic Capital – After a week of several battles, the Rebel Penguin Federation surrendered their fight against Army Republic, ending what turned out to be possibly the hardest fought war in months. Read more for the full recap of the war. 

Prior to starting their invasions of RPF territory, AR helped the Nachos secure a victory by raiding their battle on November 11. A few days later, the war between the Nachos and RPF ended. On November 18, Army Republic issued a declaration of war, and invaded Snow Board the next day.

We’ve been having great events recently, but the AR needs some hype as well as some bloodshed to calm us down from hunger of battle. We have nothing against the RPF, but we’re hungry for war. Let’s have a fun war shall we?

The full details of the beginning of the war can be found on this CPAC post. At the end of the battle, Elmikey surrendered and AR took control of the server.

November 20

Battle of Icebound

For the second battle of the war, AR invaded Icebound with a top size of 14, facing RPF’s 12. They agreed to a tie, so RPF kept the server.

November 21

Battle of Zipline

Army Republic continued their assault on RPF territory by invading Zipline. They won the battle with their force of 16 troops, forcing a surrender from RPF who maxed 12.

November 22

Battle of Walrus

The next battle took place on Walrus, with AR invading once again. RPF improved their size, working up to 18, but still were overtaken by AR’s 25. They surrendered the battle and handed over the server.

RPF had scheduled AUSIA invasions of AR’s empire, attempting to take advantage of AR not having an active AUSIA division. However, after some negotiations, RPF agreed to turn them into raids to keep things fair.

November 23

Battle of Big Foot

Yet again, RPF found themselves defending their nation from AR, this time on Big Foot. AR won the battle, maxing 16 compared to RPF’s 11.

November 24

More scheduling conflicts were addressed; this time AR claiming that because they didn’t have an active UK division, RPF’s UK invasions were also invalid. Two battles also took place, one being an RPF invasion, and the other an AR invasion. Both resulted in AR victories. The servers were not specified.

November 25

Battles of Beanie and Sparkle

RPF carried out their UK invasions of Beanie and Sparkle. AR, despite claiming them to be invalid, showed up to defend. This resulted in the only disputed battles in the war. AR maxed 20 and 18, while RPF maxed 8 and 15.

Invasion of White House

RPF didn’t show up to defend the server, giving AR the victory.

November 27

Invasion of Tuxedo

After a day off, Army Republic carried out the final act of the war, invading RPF’s capital server with an astonishing top size of 43+. RPF didn’t log on for the battle, so AR won the server with ease.

Later that day, the war ended with the Rebel Penguin Federation surrendering and agreeing to a treaty which handed over Tuxedo, Snow Board, and Zipline to Army Republic.

Lorenzo’s Statement

Despite this war receiving very little attention from the rest of the community, it contained many elements that make it possibly one of the best wars fought this year. Let’s just look at the facts: Over the course of a week, 9 actual battles took place (meaning both sides showed up). There were a total of 11 scheduled invasions/defenses, so only 2 of them resulted in a no-show. Both sides remained focused on battling, not bashing each other with mud-slinging posts or multilogging accusations. They remained level-headed, and when faced with the issue of RPF’s AUSIA division advantage, actually came to an agreement to keep it fair instead of crying about it and ignoring each other. There was almost no hiding from fighting; RPF didn’t show up to the last two battles, but after a bunch of losses, they must have been demoralized, especially when having to face an enemy 40+ strong with their sizes. Finally, RPF gracefully admitted defeat multiple times, even for battles that were fairly close.

When was the last time the community has seen a war like this? Most recent conflicts don’t even share more than one characteristic with this one. Everything about it evokes what Club Penguin armies truly exist for: War for the sport of it. No hiding, no multilogging accusations, no whining, knowing when to fold them, and knowing when to hold them.

What are your thoughts on this war? Do you believe it sets a good example for armies to follow? Comment below with your opinion.

Lorenzo Bean

CPA Central Executive Producer

 

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15 Responses

  1. Shout out to Lorenzo for continuing to record and post quality battles rather than dull philosophies and editorials every week.

  2. Also, your recap was perfect. Regardless of the tension the war ended with, I still kept a fair amount of respect towards RPF for giving us a real war.

  3. Reblogged this on Club Penguin: – Ghost Trooper Club Penguin and commented:
    Club Penguin Army Central’s coverage of our latest war with RPF!

  4. Hard fought AR, and well done RPF.

  5. Great post Lorenzo. RPF gave us a great war.

  6. Thanks dude. I really hope people who read this will realize that this is how wars should be fought, and then follow this example.

  7. Hope there’s another one like this.

  8. Great war. This is what the community needs. The community needs to play it out fair.Tthe community needs to show up at battles rather than ignoring invasions. They should show up, play fair, abide with the Mammoth Convention and see who the real victor is! Nonetheless, great job AR and good job to RPF as well.

  9. When you are partying on your newly gained server.
    http://prntscr.com/986lb6

  10. Good job AR and RPF!

  11. Waiiiiitttttt, if RPF’s capital was Tuxedo, then what is their new capital?

  12. If all wars could be like this.

  13. Well done RPF and AR.

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